Monday, 7 March 2016

Inspired by Grandma's Apron...


Hello my lovelies...
Monday always means a little snippet of Tilly Rose ramblings so 
grab a cuppa, put your feet up for five mins and indulge in a little
nostalgia with me...

Many of us celebrated Mother's Day here in the UK yesterday.
Sadly my Mum, Mum-in-law and two Nans are no longer with us to have a chat and catch up...
I do so miss them dearly.

I do so miss their kind words, their wisdom and everyday gossip

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Yesterday for me was a day full of memories so I thought I would share a little snippet...
One thing that all of those special ladies had in common was that every day of their lives they wore an apron whether they were doing the housework, expecting visitors or even a visit from the Queen!



As many of you know I am busy getting ready for a small exhibition focusing on the connection of women with cloth and thread throughout time here in the Fens and so many times the subject of an apron has appeared in my research...


A few years ago, a lovely American friend of mine sent me this snippet which
totally sums up the use of this item of everyday wear...
Although it obviously refers to an American lifestyle it still
reminds me so much of my Nan...

The History of Grandma's Apron

I don't think our kids know what an apron is.

The principal use of Grandma's apron was to protect the dress underneath because she only had a few and because it was easier to wash aprons than dresses and aprons required less material.
But along with that, it served as a potholder for removing hot pans from the oven.

It was wonderful for drying children's tears, and on occasion was even used for cleaning out dirty ears. 

From the chicken coop, the apron was used for  carrying eggs, fussy chicks, and sometimes  half-hatched eggs to be finished in the warming  oven.

When company came, those aprons were ideal hiding places for shy kids.
And when the weather was cold, Grandma wrapped it around her arms.

Those big old aprons wiped many a perspiring brow, bent over the hot wood stove.
Chips and kindling wood were brought into the kitchen in that apron.
From the garden, it carried all sorts of vegetables.
After the peas had been shelled, it carried out the hulls.

In the Autumn, the apron was used to bring in apples that had fallen from the trees.
When unexpected company drove up the road, it was surprising how much furniture that old apron  could dust in a matter of seconds.

When  dinner was ready, Grandma walked out onto the  porch, waved her apron, and the men folk knew it  was time to come in from the fields to  dinner.

It will be a long time before  someone invents something that will replace that  'old-time apron' that served so many  purposes.

Send  this to those who would know (and love) the  story about Grandma's aprons.

REMEMBER:
Grandma  used to set her hot baked apple pies on the  window sill to cool. Her granddaughters set  theirs on the window sill to  thaw. 

The  Govt. Would go crazy now trying to figure out  how many germs were on that apron.

I  don't think I ever caught anything from an apron  - but love...



I still wear an apron every day.... whatever I may be doing...
How about you lovelies?



Am I the only one?
Do tell...

Toodle-ooh for now....